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  1. Semester One: History of Critical Writing in Film and Television 71 items
    Semester One focuses on the history of critical writing in film and television. This will give you an introduction to film and television as disciplines and provide students from all backgrounds with theoretical grounding in the approaches that have been influential in shaping understandings over time. The key texts, debates and interventions to be examined are drawn from a variety of historical periods and geographical spaces and include foundational paradigms and more recent developments within film and television scholarship. You will be encouraged to reflect on what constitutes ‘best practice’ in the field and locate specific essays within a broader historical and disciplinary context.
    1. Week 1 (seminar only: 19th September): Digital Challenges (1) - Introduction + Theories of Convergence (lecturer: Dr Ian Garwood) 17 items
      This week we will begin by introducing ourselves and our academic backgrounds before looking at the structure of the core course and what is expected of you in terms of weekly participation and course assessments. For the remainder of the session we will move on to examine theories of convergence. What do we mean by different kinds of convergence (technological, economic, cultural)? How does convergence impact on us as audiences (pleasures, experiences, participation)? Why do we continue to teach film and television as distinct scholarly disciplines?
      1. Screening (please watch these online programmes before the seminar on 19th September: there is no screening in the cinema on 18th September) 13 items
      2. Required Reading 4 items
        1. Television as digital media 2011

          Book  See: Graeme Turner, ‘Convergence and Divergence: International Experiences of Digital Television’, pp. 31-51.

    2. Week 2 (screening: 25th/seminar: 26th September): Historicising the Screen (1) - Reception and the Archive (lecturer: Dr Rebecca Harrison) 8 items
      Please note the seminar on 26th September begins earlier than usual, at 9am. The first part of this week will look at the film Shooting Stars and analyse it in relation to sound, movement, gender, etc. We will then consider whether the chosen newspaper articles refute or support Gledhill’s thinking about melodrama before asking what these sources tell us about changes to media based on their format.
      1. Screening 2 items
        1. Shooting Stars 1928

          Webpage  IMDb entry on the film. Please attend the screening in the Andrew Stewart Cinema on 25th September.

        2. Mabel at the Wheel (1914)

          Audio-visual document Essential Please attend screening in Andrew Stewart Cinema on 25th September. Online version for further study only.

      2. Required Reading 6 items
        1. British cinema in documents - Sarah Street 2000

          Book  See: Sarah Street, ‘The Texts and Methods of Film History(ies)’, pp. 1-9, available via blue Preview button.

        2. Reframing British cinema, 1918-1928: between restraint and passion - Christine Gledhill 2003

          Book  See: Christine Gledhill, ‘Class Acts: Genres, Modes and Performers', pp. 123-150, available via Online Resource button.

    3. Week 3 (screening: 2nd/seminar: 3rd October): Foundational Paradigms (1) - Theories of Authorship in Film and TV (lecturer: Dr David Archibald) 3 items
      Focusing on the films and television programmes directed by the British filmmaker Ken Loach, the session will explore ongoing debates about notions of authorship and collaboration in film and television production.
      1. Screening 1 item
        1. The Angels’ Share (2012)

          Audio-visual document  Please attend the screening in the cinema on 2nd October. The online version is for further study only.

      2. Required Reading 2 items
        1. The Sage handbook of film studies 2008

          Book  See: Caughie, J. ‘Authors and Auteurs: the uses of theory', pp. 408-423.

        2. Contemporary cinema and neoliberal ideology - Ewa Mazierska 2018

          Book  Read: Archibald, D. (2017) 'Team Loach and Sixteen Films: authorship, collaboration, leadership (and football)', pp. 25-41

    4. Week 4 (screening: 9th/seminar: 10th October): Foundational Paradigms (2) - What it means to study a world of cinemas (lecturer: Professor David Martin-Jones) 6 items
      This session considers what it means to study a world of cinemas, charting this debate from its emergence in the 1980s (coinciding with the turn to history, definitions of the art film, and increasing interest in the idea of national cinemas) to the present (coinciding with the transnational and ethical turns, and increasing interest in film festivals and film tourism). This is to understand the transformation of the contested term “world cinema” from Orientalising, homogenizing exotic other of Hollywood, to global inclusivity (“a world of cinemas”), and what this means for our situating of the “centres” and “peripheries” of a globalized world.
      1. Screening 1 item
        1. Au revoir Taipei 2010

          Webpage  IMDb entry on film. Please attend the screening in the Andrew Stewart Cinema on 9th October

      2. Required Reading 2 items
        1. Remapping world cinema: identity, culture and politics in film - Stephanie Dennison, Song Hwee Lim 2006

          Book Essential See: Nagib, L. ‘Towards a Positive Definition of World Cinema’, pp. 30-37.

      3. Further Reading 3 items
        1. World cinema and the ethics of realism - Lúcia Nagib c2011

          Book Further

    5. Week 5 (16th/17th October): Approaches to Technology (1) - Media Archaeology (lecturer: Dr Tim Barker) 4 items
      The session this week will introduce key topics in media archaeology. Media archaeology is an approach to studying media that focuses on technical functions, rather than on screen aesthetics. It seeks to both offer a new understanding of the history of media and also the epistemological effects of media, including printed writing, film and more contemporary storage and transmission media. We will begin by looking closely at the work of Friedrich Kittler and his formulation of media archaeology as a form of discourse analysis. We will also look at the work of Marshall McLuhan and investigate some of his thought on technology and the development of so called ‘culture’.
      1. Screening 1 item
        1. McLuhans Wake by Kevin McMahon (2002). The 4 Laws of Media & Marshal McLuhan

          Audio-visual document  Please attend the screening in the Andrew Stewart Cinema on 16th October. The online version is for further study only.

      2. Required Reading 2 items
        1. Gramophone, film, typewriter - Friedrich A. Kittler c1999

          Book Essential See: Friedrich A. Kittler, ‘Film’, pp. 115-182.

        2. What is media archaeology? - Jussi Parikka 2012

          Book  See: Jussi Parikka, ‘Introduction’.

      3. Further Reading 1 item
        1. Media archaeology: approaches, applications, and implications - ProQuest (Firm) 2011

          Book Further Please read: Wolfgang Ernst, 'Media Archeography: Method and Machine versus History and Narrative of Media', pp.239-255

    6. Week 6 (seminar only: 24th October): Approaches to Technology (2) - Videographic Film Studies (lecturer: Dr Ian Garwood) 10 items
      In this session, we will discuss the emergence of the video essay as a scholarly research format. Key examples will be screened and discussed, and writing (and video essays) advocating the form will be reviewed. By the end of the session, you will have a foundational knowledge of the video essay as an emerging form of film and television studies scholarship.
      1. Required Reading and Viewing - (please view/read all this material before the seminar on 24th October: there is no screening in the cinema on 23rd October) 10 items
        the 'screenings' are listed with the readings for this week as they occupy the same status as the reading: they represent critical thinking about film, expressed through audiovisual means, rather than only through the written word.
        1. Women's Time-Image | [in]Transition - Jessica McGoff

          Webpage Essential Please watch video essay and read accompanying written statements

        2. Fembot in a Red Dress | [in]Transition - Allison de Fren

          Webpage Essential Please watch video essay and read accompanying written statements

        3. Necsus | Videographic scene analyses, part 1

          Webpage Essential Please read the written statement by Miklos Kiss and watch the accompanying videos by Liz Greene, Patrick Keating, Davide Rapp and Miklos Kiss (links contained in written statement)

        4. The language and style of film criticism 2011

          Book  See: Christian Keathley, ‘La caméra-stylo: Notes on Video Criticism and Cinephilia.’

    7. Week 7 (30th/31st October): Digital Challenges (2) - Producer/Audience Relationships in Digital Television (lecturer: Dr Becky Bartlett) 6 items
      This week examines technological developments in television brought on by digitisation. Drawing from fan studies and television studies we will explore the changing dynamics between producer, text and audience, the rise of participatory culture, and the strategies employed by broadcasters and providers to attract and retain audiences in the new television landscape. For this week, you should complete the screenings online. This is to make room for a lecture by a visiting academic, Dr Kevin Sanson, who will be presenting research on working conditions in the screen industries. The lecture will take place at 11am, Tuesday 30th October in the Andrew Stewart Cinema - it will finish by 11.55am. The talk is not directly tied to the Week 7 topic, but is relevant to work you will do elsewhere on the degree, particularly in Semester Two.
      1. Screening 2 items
        1. Sherlock (2013): Season 3 Episode 1 - The Empty Hearse

          Audio-visual document Essential Please watch this online in your own time, before the seminar on 31st October.

        2. "America's Next Top Model" The Girl Who Gets Pwn'd (TV Episode 2012

          Audio-visual document Essential Please watch this online in your own time, before the seminar on 31st October.

      2. Required Reading 4 items
        1. INVITING AUDIENCES IN - Derek Johnson 04/2007

          Article Essential

        2. New media: theories and practices of digitextuality 2015

          Book Essential Read: John Thornton Caldwell. “Second-shift media aesthetics: programming, interactivity and user flows.”, pp. 127-144

        3. Convergence culture: where old and new media collide - Henry Jenkins c2006 (electronic resource)

          Book Essential Read: Henry Jenkins. “Buying into American Idol: How we are being sold on reality television.”, pp. 59-92

    8. Week 8 (6th/7th November): Historicising the Screen (2) - Bigger on the Inside: The Small Screen and Epic Storytelling (lecturer: Professor Karen Lury) 5 items
      Through an examination of the first and most recent episodes of Doctor Who, we will consider how television has both changed (e.g., convergence, niche audiences) and stayed the same (aiming at the mainstream). We will also discuss TV’s ongoing need to reference itself.
      1. Screening 3 items
        1. Doctor Who (1963) - An Unearthly Child: Part One

          Audio-visual document  Please attend screening in the Andrew Stewart Cinema on 6th November. The online version is for further study only.

        2. Doctor Who (2014) - World Enough and Time

          Audio-visual document  Please attend screening in the Andrew Stewart Cinema on 6th November. The online version is for further study only.

        3. Doctor Who (2014) - The Doctor Falls

          Audio-visual document  Please attend screening in the Andrew Stewart Cinema on 6th November. The online version is for further study only.

      2. Required Reading 2 items
        1. Seeing things: television in the age of uncertainty - John Ellis 2000

          Book Essential See: Chapters 4, 5, 11; pp.39-60, 61-73, 162-178. Chapter 4, pp. 39-60, available via Online Resource button.

    9. Week 9 (13th/14th November): Exhibition and Consumption Practices (1) - Television, Domestic Space and Medium Specificity (lecturer: Dr Amy Holdsworth) 7 items
      In this week we will be thinking about the significance of television as a domestic object/medium and as a ‘window on the world’. How did television arrive in the home? How did it affect the relationship between public and private? And what fears and anxieties has this produced?
      1. Screening 3 items
        1. Ghostwatch 1992

          Webpage  IMDb entry on Ghostwatch. Please attend the screening in the Andrew Stewart Cinema on 13th November.

        2. Bite Back on Ghostwatch (Part 1) - YouTube

          Audio-visual document  Please watch Bite Back in your own time AFTER the screening of Ghostwatch and before the seminar on 14th November.

        3. Bite Back on Ghostwatch (Part 2) - YouTube

          Audio-visual document  Please watch Bite Back in your own time AFTER the screening of Ghostwatch and before the seminar on 14th November.

      2. Required Reading 4 items
        1. Make room for TV: television and the family ideal in postwar America - Lynn Spigel 1992.

          Book  See: Spigel, L. ‘Television in the Family Circle’ pp. 36-72.

        2. Haunted media: electronic presence from telegraphy to television - Jeffrey Sconce 2000

          Book  See: Sconce J., 'Introduction', pp. 1-20, available via Online Resource button.

        3. Ambient television: visual culture and public space - Anna McCarthy, American Council of Learned Societies 2001 (electronic resource)

          Book Essential Please read: 'Introduction', pp.1-26 and 'Chapter 4', pp.117-154

    10. Week 10 (20th/21st November): Exhibition and Consumption Practices (2) - New Cinema History (lecturer: Professor John Caughie) 5 items
      The seminar will be on New Cinema History, an attempt over the last ten years or so to re-orient film studies and cinema history away from questions of the text towards questions of moviegoing, exhibition and reception: towards the social experience of cinema. It will raise questions of how such a history of the social experience of cinema is to be researched, but, at the same time, it will address the issue of what part films themselves play in this history.
      1. Screening 2 items
        1. Modern Times (1936)

          Audio-visual document Essential Please attend the screening in the Andrew Stewart Cinema on 20th November. This online version is for further study only.

        2. Fantômas: In the Shadow of the Guillotine 1913

          Webpage Essential Please attend the screening in the Andrew Stewart Cinema on 20th November. Online version for further study only.

      2. Required Reading 3 items
        1. Going to the movies: Hollywood and the social experience of cinema - Richard Maltby, Melvyn Stokes, Robert Clyde Allen 2007

          Book Essential Please read Introduction, pp. 1-22. Available via Online Resource Button.

        2. Explorations in new cinema history: approaches and case studies - Wiley Online Library (Online service) 2011

          Book Essential Please read: Robert C. Allen, ‘Reimagining the history of the experience of cinema’, pp 41-57

  2. Semester Two: Research Methods and Preparation 13 items
    Semester Two explores a range of critical and methodological approaches to the study of film and television and places a focus on dissertation preparation. Different styles of research will be considered in relation to textual analysis; production and policy; history and archives; and audiences and ethics. Site visits have been arranged to Film City Glasgow and the Moving Image Archive and guest speakers will be invited to deliver specialist sessions (i.e. archive research, ethical issues). The course will conclude with sessions preparing you for dissertation research and life after graduation (Peer Review, Careers Session).
    1. Week 1 (8th/9th January): Scoping a Research Project 0 items
      This week we will look at scoping a research project by hearing from current PhD students on their chosen topics and the problems and challenges they have faced over the course of their research (this session takes place on 9th January). On 8th January, student Learning Services will provide a workshop on writing at postgraduate level. There is no set reading this week but you are expected to meet with your fellow group members to begin work on your group project. Groups will be assigned in class.
    2. Week 2 (15th/16th January): Film City visit/Television and the Archive Seminar 4 items
      On 15th January, we will visit Film City Glasgow for a tour of the facilities followed by a Q&A session. On 16th January, we will look at the use of television archive material in a range of history programmes (e.g., social history, political history, history for kids, etc) and engage in practical tasks based on researching for television.
      1. Required Reading 4 items
        1. History and the media - David Cannadine 2004

          Book  See: David Cannadine, 'Introduction', pp. 10-12. Available via Online Resource Button.

        2. History and the media - David Cannadine 2004

          Book  See: Simon Schama, 'Television and the Trouble with History', pp. 20-33. Available via Online Resource Button.

        3. Televising history: mediating the past in postwar Europe - Erin Bell, Ann Gray 2010

          Book  See: Luisa Cigognetti and Pierre Sorlin, 'History on Television: The Problem of Sources', pp. 28-41.

    3. Week 3 (22nd/23rd January): Moving Image Archive Visit/Production Studies seminar 3 items
      On 22nd January, we will visit the Moving Image Archive to be offered a tour of the facilities followed by an introduction to the available collections and guidance on how to use the online archive. The focus of the workshop on 23rd January is the development of production studies and the different levels of analysis this may entail. This will include a consideration of policy and how to conduct expert interviews.
      1. Required Reading 3 items
        1. A handbook of media and communication research: qualitative and quantitative methodologies 2012

          Book Essential See: Amanda D. Lotz and Horace Newcomb, ‘The Production of Entertainment Media’, pp. 71-86.

        2. Behind the screen: inside European production cultures - Petr Szczepanik, Patrick Vonderau 2013 (electronic resource)

          Book Essential See: Philip Drake, ‘Policy or Practice? Deconstructing the Creative Industries’, pp. 221-236.

        3. Advancing media production research: shifting sites, methods, and politics 2016

          Book Essential See: Haane Bruun, ‘The Qualitative Interview in Media Production Studies’, pp. 131-146.

    4. Week 4 (29th/30th January): Audiences and Ethics 2 items
      This week examines the various research methodologies available for studying film and television audiences. In particular, we will look at questionnaires and interviews and think about the ethical issues involved in dealing with human subjects through a focus on the ‘Comfort TV Research Project’. There will be a screening related to the project on 29th January and a workshop on the project on 30th January. You should consult the College of Arts Ethics Policy and Application Procedures in advance of class http://www.gla.ac.uk/colleges/arts/research/ethics/.
      1. Required Reading 2 items
        1. The television studies book - Christine Geraghty, David Lusted 1998

          Book Essential See: Christine Geraghty, 'Audiences and "Ethnography": Questions of Practice', pp. 141-157, available via Online Resource button.

    5. Week 5 (5th/6th February): Textual Analysis: Film 1 item
      This week we will focus on the use of textual analysis in film studies by examining the different approaches available and the problems which may be encountered. You will also have the opportunity to produce your own close analysis of a selected film text. The screening on 5th February will provide the basis for the seminar on 6th February
      1. Required Reading 1 item
        1. Film art: an introduction - David Bordwell, Kristin Thompson, Jeff Smith c2013

          Book Essential See: Chapters on mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing and sound in the cinema. Chapter 4: The Shot: Mise-en-Scene available via Online Resource Button.

    6. Week 6 (12th/13th February): Textual Analysis: Television 1 item
      This week we will focus on textual analysis in television studies by examining the different approaches available and the problems which may be encountered. You will also have the opportunity to produce your own close analysis of a selected television text. The screening on 12th February will form the basis for the seminar on 13th February.
      1. Required Reading 1 item
        1. Interpreting television - Karen Lury 2005

          Book Essential See: Chapters on Image, Sound, Time and Space. Chapter 2: Sound is available via Online Resource Button.

    7. Week 7 (19th/20th February): Group Presentations + Writing a Literature Review 2 items
      On 19th February, you will present your proposed research projects in groups as part of Assessment 3. On 20th February, we will move on to dissertation preparation, a key aspect of which involves reviewing existing scholarly literature relating to your chosen research topic. In this session, we will study two examples in detail to consider the different approaches that can be taken and think about strategies for writing your literature review.
      1. Required Reading 2 items
        1. Serialised sexual violence in teen television drama series - Susan Berridge 2010

          Book Essential See: 'Literature Review: Troubling Teens and Anxious Adults', pp. 25-63.

        2. Deleuze, Japanese cinema, and the atom bomb: the spectre of impossibility - David Deamer 2014

          Book Essential See: David Deamer, 'Introduction: Event, Cinema, Cineosis', pp. 1-30.

    8. Week 8 (27th February only): Peer Review - Developing the Dissertation Proposal 0 items
      In this session, students will present their initial ideas for their dissertation topic and be offered constructive feedback from the rest of the class and course convenor.
    9. Week 9 (6th March only): Peer Review - Identifying Relevant Literature 0 items
      In this session, students will develop their dissertation proposals and identify existing scholarly literature in the field. Constructive feedback will be offered by the rest of the class and course convenor.
    10. Week 10 (12th/13th March): Careers Session + Individual Tutorials 0 items
      On 12th March, we will reflect on the graduate attributes you have acquired over the course so far and welcome Ann Duff (Careers Manager) and Amy Holdsworth (PGR Convenor) to discuss potential career opportunities following the MLitt. This includes academic career paths for those of you interested in pursuing a PhD. We also aim to bring in an outside speaker from industry (subject to availability). On 13th March, you will be given a time slot to meet with the course convenor to discuss Assignment 4 and your overall progress.