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  1. Welcome to Saints and Sinners.  This will be the main source of information on reading for seminars and essays throughout the course.  Reading for workshops, as well as podcasts, other sources, and information about the course, will be published in the Moodle.

     

  2. Background reading 19 items
    This course covers a complex period, and it will not be possible to cover all aspects in detail in the lectures. So it will be important for you to do background reading to fill in the gaps. The Marsh text provides a good overview, and pages from this will be suggested throughout the course.
    1. Texts 5 items
      1. The course will use two textbooks and one source collection as its backbone, although of course many others are available.  It is impossible to cover all of the political, social and religious developments in the lectures, so you should do the recommended reading in at least one of these textbooks.  If you wish to use an alternative, that's fine, although interpretations change so rapidly you should restrict yourself to textbooks published in the last twenty years or so.

      2. Popular religion in sixteenth-century England: holding their peace - Christopher W. Marsh 1998

        Book Essential Takes a thematic rather than a chronological approach. An excellent clear introduction to many of the main themes of the course, written by one of the leading religious historians of the period. Available in multiple copies in the Library, or by ordering yourself. (I will also order for Bookshop.)

      3. The post-Reformation: religion, politics and society in Britain 1603-1714 - John Spurr 2014

        Book Recommended Two books in one. The first part provides a chronological overview of religion and politics under each monarch from James I/VI onwards. The second part takes a thematic approach, covering some of the same topics as Marsh's textbook.

      4. Religion & society in early modern England: a sourcebook - David Cressy, Lori Anne Ferrell, Ebooks Corporation Limited 2007

        Book Essential Available as an e-book, and will provide reading for some seminars and workshops.

      5. The Elizabethan world - Susan Doran, Norman L. Jones 2011

        Book Recommended Excellent overview which will help you to place religion in the context of political and social developments, with chapters on Parliament, local government, and many other topics. Very useful for background reading.

    2. Reformation 7 items
      1. Heretics and believers: a history of the English Reformation - Peter Marshall 2018

        Book Recommended The last word on the Reformation.

      2. The age of Reformation: the Tudor and Stewart realms, 1485-1603 - Alec Ryrie, Ebooks Corporation Limited 2013

        Book Recommended Only the chapters on England will be relevant to this course, although the comparison between the two Reformations is instructive.

      3. Reformation: Europe's house divided, 1490-1700 - Diarmaid MacCulloch 2003, c2004

        Book Further

      4. Palgrave advances in the European reformations - Alec Ryrie 2006

        Book Further

      5. The Oxford encyclopedia of the Reformation - Hans Joachim Hillerbrand 1996

        Book 

    3. Revolution 7 items
      We are spoiled for choice for texts on the English Civil Wars. Braddick provides an excellent detailed history; Miller is necessarily shorter but leaves out a lot. The Oxford Handbook provides detailed essays by leading historians. Hutton looks at cultural change over the period of the course.
      1. God's fury, England's fire: a new history of the English Civil Wars - M. J. Braddick 2008

        Book Recommended

      2. The Rise and Fall of Merry England - Ronald Hutton 23/06/1994

        Book Recommended

      3. English society, 1580-1680 - Keith Wrightson, Dawson Books 1982 (electronic resource)

        Book Recommended

      4. A social history of England, 1500-1750 2017

        Book Further

  3. Week 1: The English Reformation 1 item
    See the course Moodle for lecture slides and reading.
    1. History and fiction (Tuesday workshop) 1 item
      See the course Moodle for the readings and recordings which support this workshop.
  4. Week 2: Debating the Reformation 7 items
    1. Seminar: Anticlericalism 7 items
      Those presenting at this seminar should choose at least ONE item from the recommended reading and explain how it helps to answer one of the seminar questions. They should also bring at least TWO additional questions for the class to discuss. Presenters are NOT expected to summarise the essential reading. When more than one person is presenting at the same seminar, they should meet in advance to plan the session.
      1. Before the seminar, please think about what you have read with the following questions in mind:

         

        • How anticlerical were ordinary people during and after the Reformation?
        • What does this reveal about popular views and acceptance of the Reformation?
        • Did clerical behaviour create anti-clerical feeling? 
        • What kind of clergyman did people want?

      2. Popular politics and the English Reformation - Shagan, Ethan H. c2003

        Webpage Essential Read ch. 4

      3. Religion & society in early modern England: a sourcebook - David Cressy, Lori Anne Ferrell, Ebooks Corporation Limited 2007

        Book Essential Read George Gifford's Country Divinity, pp.114-119. (*corrected page numbers*)

  5. Week 3: Religion of Protestants 2 items
    1. Success and Failure (Tuesday workshop) 2 items
      See the course Moodle for the worksheet for this workshop.
  6. Week 4: Popular Culture and Print 8 items
    1. Seminar: Religion in Church and at Home 8 items
      Those presenting at this seminar should choose at least ONE item from the recommended reading and explain how it helps to answer one of the seminar questions. They should also bring at least TWO additional questions for the class to discuss. Presenters are NOT expected to summarise the essential reading. When more than one person is presenting at the same seminar, they should meet in advance to plan the session.
      1. Before the seminar, please think about what you have read with the following questions in mind:

         

        • One historian has characterised the religion of most people in post-Reformation England as 'tepid'. Others have highlighted how earnestly laypeople worshipped. Which best describes the beliefs of the majority of people?
        • Were most people Protestants?

      2. The post-Reformation: religion, politics and society in Britain 1603-1714 - John Spurr 2014

        Book Essential Read ch. 9. Also recommended: ch. 11 and pp. 306-13. (Note: I have had reports of problems accessing this e-book. I tried it myself and was able to download the book to my computer. If I tried instead to "read online", this produced an error message. So, you need to download the book. The process may require you to download an app or software.

      3. Being Protestant in Reformation Britain - Alec Ryrie, Oxford University Press 2013

        Book Essential Read p. 6, chs. 13, 14.

      4. Living with the Bible in post-Reformation England: the Materiality of Text, Image and Object in Domestic Life - Tara Hamling 2014

        Article Recommended Summarises the main arguments of Decorating the 'Godly' Household and A Day at Home.

      5. Decorating the 'godly' household: religious art in post-reformation Britain - Tara Hamling, Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art c2010

        Book Recommended Esp. 92-119 or 24-65. Pp. 92-119 available online.

      6. A day at home in early modern England: material culture and domestic life, 1500-1700 - Tara Hamling, Catherine Richardson 2017

        Book Recommended Esp. pp. 197 (Visual Narratives) to 215, available online.

      7. Sacred space in early modern Europe - Will Coster, Andrew Spicer 2005

        Book Recommended See especially chapter by John Craig, 'Psalms, groans and dog-whippers', pp. 104-123, available online.

  7. Week 5 10 items
    1. Defining Puritanism (Tuesday workshop) 10 items
      1. The Cambridge Companion to Puritanism 2008

        Book Essential Read ch. 2, John Craig, The Growth of English Puritanism

      2. Religion and society in early modern England: a sourcebook - David Cressy, Lori Anne Ferrell 2007

        Book Essential Read pp. 96-104 (A view of popish abuses), 114-119 (Gifford), 119-122 (Stubbes), 126-129 (Marprelate), 144-146 (Ward).

      3. The Reign of Elizabeth I: court and culture in the last decade - J. A. Guy, Folger Institute 1995

        Book Recommended Read ch. 7, P Collinson, 'Ecclesiastical vitriol: religious satire in the 1590s and the invention of puritanism'. Available online.

      4. Richard Bancroft and Elizabethan anti-Puritanism - Patrick Collinson, Askews & Holts Library Services 2013

        Book Recommended You may read chapters 1 and 5 instead of 'Ecclesiastical Vitriol'.

      5. The Character of an Antipuritan - Christopher Haigh 01/10/2004

        Article Recommended Quite an approachable article, which builds on Collinson's insights by examining how puritans described their enemies.

      6. The culture of English puritanism, 1560-1700 - Christopher Durston, Jacqueline Eales 1996

        Book Recommended Read ch. 5, P Lake, 'A charitable Christian hatred', or other chapters from this collection. Chapter 5 is available online.

      7. English puritanism 1603-1689 - John Spurr 1998

        Book Recommended

  8. Week 6: Reading week (no class meetings) 0 items
  9. Week 7. Parish Conflict (Tuesday workshop) 4 items
    1. In addition to the primary sources on the course Moodle, you should read at least one of the three articles listed below.

  10. Week 8 11 items
    1. Seminar: Reformation of Manners 11 items
      Those presenting at this seminar should choose at least ONE item from the recommended reading and explain how it helps to answer one of the seminar questions. They should also bring at least TWO additional questions for the class to discuss. Presenters are NOT expected to summarise the essential reading. When more than one person is presenting at the same seminar, they should meet in advance to plan the session.
      1. The campaign for moral reform began in the late 16th century, and Sunday recreations became an especially contentious issue in the early 17th century. Before the seminar, please think about what you have read with the following questions in mind:

         

        • Were puritans the only English protestants to be concerned about the reformation of manners, and why did this issue become so important in our period? 
        • Why did the puritans object to Sunday sports, and why did the Crown support them? 

      2. The Rise and Fall of Merry England - Ronald Hutton 23/06/1994

        Book Essential Read ch. 5. The preceding chapter, ch. 4, The Reformation of Manners, provides fuller context, and is also recommended.

      3. Religion and society in early modern England: a sourcebook - David Cressy, Lori Anne Ferrell 2007

        Book Essential Read pp. 169-181 (King's Declaration, Bishop Piers's Report, Henry Burton)

      4. Belief and practice in Reformation England: a tribute to Patrick Collinson from his students - Patrick Collinson, Susan Wabuda, C. J. Litzenberger 1998

        Book Recommended See A Walsham, '"A Glose of Godlines": Philip Stubbes, Elizabethan Grub Street and the invention of Puritanism'

      5. Poverty and Piety in an English Village - Keith Wrightson, David Levine 01/06/1995

        Book Further

  11. Week 9. Essays (Tuesday workshop) 0 items
  12. Week 10 8 items
    1. Seminar: Popular Puritanism and Iconoclasm (Thursday seminars) 8 items
      Those presenting at this seminar should choose at least ONE item from the recommended reading and explain how it helps to answer one of the seminar questions. They should also bring at least TWO additional questions for the class to discuss. Presenters are NOT expected to summarise the essential reading. When more than one person is presenting at the same seminar, they should meet in advance to plan the session.
      1. Before the seminar, please think about what you have read with the following questions in mind:

         

        The early 1640s saw a new wave of iconoclasm, both official and through crowd action.

        • Does popular iconoclasm show the extent of popular support for puritanism? 
        • Was this iconoclasm primarily directed at Laudianism, or did it reflect an older protestant impulse to complete the Reformation?
        • Or was it the action of a drunken and unruly mob?

      2. Religion and society in early modern England: a sourcebook - David Cressy, Lori Anne Ferrell 2007

        Book Essential Read pp. 215-218

      3. England's iconoclasts: Vol. 1- - Margaret Aston 1988-

        Book Recommended

      4. Revel, riot and rebellion: popular politics and culture in England 1603-1660 - David Underdown 1985

        Book Further See esp. chs. 1, 5, 6.

      5. Broken idols of the English Reformation - Margaret Aston, Askews & Holts Library Services 2016

        Book Further This excellent work is Margaret Aston's life work. Although long, it is worth reading selectively, e.g. the chapter on glass.

  13. Week 11: Witchcraft and Magic 12 items
    1. Seminar: Witch-Hunting during the Civil Wars 12 items
      Those presenting at this seminar should choose at least ONE item from the recommended reading and explain how it helps to answer one of the seminar questions. They should also bring at least TWO additional questions for the class to discuss. Presenters are NOT expected to summarise the essential reading. When more than one person is presenting at the same seminar, they should meet in advance to plan the session.
      1. Before the seminar, please think about what you have read with the following questions in mind:

         

        The most intense witch-hunt in England occurred during the Civil Wars, in 1645-47. 

        • Why were so many witches prosecuted at this time? 
        • Was this episode typical of the prosecution of witches in 16th and 17th century England, or was it exceptional? 
        • How do these prosecutions help us to understand popular and official beliefs about witches?

      2. Crime and mentalities in early modern England - Malcolm Gaskill, Ebooks Corporation Limited 2000

        Book Essential Read ch. 2. Note that there are *two* e-book versions (one of which is limited to one reader at a time).

      3. Crime and mentalities in early modern England - Malcolm Gaskill, Ebooks Corporation Limited 2000

        Book Essential Read ch. 2. This is printed version of the previous e-book.

      4. Women, crime and the courts in early modern England - Jennifer Kermode, Garthine Walker, Dawson Books 1994 (electronic resource)

        Book Essential Read M Gaskill, 'Witchcraft and Power in Early Modern England’

      5. Instruments of darkness: witchcraft in England, 1550-1750 - J. A. Sharpe 1996

        Book Recommended See pp. 128-147 for an account of the 1645-47 trials.

      6. Witchcraft in early modern Europe: studies in culture and belief - Jonathan Barry, Marianne Hester, Gareth Roberts 1996

        Book Recommended Ch. 9, by Sharpe, can be read as an alternative to the chapter on 1645-57 in Instruments of Darkness. See also ch.10 (Gaskill)

      7. Witchfinders: a seventeenth-century English tragedy - Malcolm Gaskill 2005

        Book Recommended

      8. Witchcraft and Evidence in Early Modern England - Malcolm Gaskill 2008

        Article Recommended Read as alternative to Crime and mentalities

      9. Order and disorder in early modern England - Anthony J. Fletcher, John Stevenson 1985

        Book Further See ch. 4, D Underdown, 'The taming of the scold'

      10. Witchcraft in early modern England - J. A. Sharpe 2001

        Book Further

  14. Essay 1 52 items
    FINAL ESSAY LIST: The readings listed here Journal articles are available electronically, by searching in the Library catalogue for author's name and initial words of title.
    1. 1. Evaluate the trustworthiness of clerical descriptions of lay religious beliefs in late 16th and early 17th century England 9 items
      1.  

        The writings of Haigh, including The Plain Man's Pathways to Heaven (2007), are a good starting point for this essay, but it is important to read other interpretations, and not to rely too much on the 'Success and Failure' article. Other 'post-revisionist' historians, including Ryrie, Hamling and Craig, have taken a more positive view.  See readings below and Bibliography, sections 2 4.1, and 4.5, on Moodle.

      2. The Plain Man's Pathways to Heaven - Christopher Haigh 13/09/2007

        Book Recommended

      3. The Character of an Antipuritan - Christopher Haigh 01/10/2004

        Article Recommended Quite an approachable article, which builds on Collinson's insights by examining how puritans described their enemies. Distills the main argument of Haigh's Plan Man's Pathways book.

      4. Being Protestant in Reformation Britain - Alec Ryrie, Oxford University Press 2013

        Book Recommended

      5. Decorating the 'godly' household: religious art in post-reformation Britain - Tara Hamling, Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art c2010

        Book Recommended

      6. The reign of Elizabeth I. - Christopher Haigh 1984

        Book Recommended See ch. 8, C Haigh, 'The Church of England, the Catholics and the People'. Available online.

      7. The English Reformation and the laity: Gloucestershire, 1540-1580 - C. J. Litzenberger 1997

        Book Recommended

    2. 2. How divisive was the preaching of the puritan clergy? 6 items
      1.  

        This debate is introduced in Haigh's article, 'The Taming of the Reformation', to which Carlson replied in 'Good Pastors or Careless Shepherds' (see week 2 seminar on Anticlericalism), but you will need to read more widely on the issues of parish conflict and sermons, including Hunt, Spurr, and the Oxford Handbook of the Early Modern Sermon. See Moodle Bibliography, sections 4.3, 4.4. 

         

      2. The Plain Man's Pathways to Heaven - Christopher Haigh 13/09/2007

        Book Recommended Esp. chs. 1, 2.

      3. The Character of an Antipuritan - Christopher Haigh 01/10/2004

        Article Recommended Quite an approachable article, which builds on Collinson's insights by examining how puritans described their enemies. Distills the main argument of Haigh's Plan Man's Pathways book.

      4. The art of hearing: English preachers and their audiences, 1590-1640 - Arnold Hunt 2010

        Book Recommended

      5. The laity and preaching in post-Reformation England - John Spurr, Dr. Williams's Library. Friends, Dr. Williams's Trust 2013

        Book Recommended

      6. The Oxford handbook of the early modern sermon - Peter E. McCullough, Hugh Adlington, Emma Rhatigan 2011 (electronic resource)

        Book Recommended

    3. 3. How effective was print in spreading the Protestant message among the people? 12 items
      1.  

        The rediscovery of print (by historians) has been central to a re-evaluation of the Reformation. The Bible and Foxe's "Book of Martyrs" were important, of course, but so also were short and cheap forms of print such as chapbooks and ballads. Tessa Watt's, Cheap Print and Popular Piety, was an essential early contribution, and the writings of Green, Walsham and Lake have also been very important. See Moodle Bibliography, section 7. 

         

      2. Cheap print and popular piety, 1550-1640 - Tessa Watt 1991

        Book Essential Essential, but in short supply.

      3. Providence in Early Modern England - Alexandra Walsham 25/01/2001

        Book Essential Read selectively.

      4. Culture and politics in early Stuart England - Kevin Sharpe, Peter Lake 1994

        Book Recommended See Peter Lake, "Deeds against Nature". See also Heaven's Speedie Hue and Crie below for an example. Available online.

      5. Print and Protestantism in Early Modern England - Ian Green 02/11/2000

        Book Recommended Read selectively.

      6. The Ashgate research companion to popular culture in early modern England - Askews & Holts Library Services 2014

        Book Recommended See especially chapters 1 (Hunt) and 4 (Molekamp).

      7. Poverty and Piety in an English Village - Keith Wrightson, David Levine 01/06/1995

        Book Recommended See especially chapter 6.

      8. Popular culture in England, c.1500-1850 - Tim Harris 1995

        Book Recommended See especially chapter 4.

      9. Heaven's Speedie Hue and Crie

        Book Further Example of the kind of writing that Lake is talking about in his article (listed earlier).

    4. 4. Why were puritans so determined to reform popular culture and morality? 15 items
      1. This question is about the campaign for the reformation of manners, and requires you to consider both puritanism and popular culture. The interpretation in Wrightson and Levine, Poverty and Piety, has been highly influential. Hutton, Rise and Fall, is a very good overview of the campaign. See Moodle Bibliography, sections 5 and 6.

      2. Poverty and Piety in an English Village - Keith Wrightson, David Levine 01/06/1995

        Book Recommended

      3. Revel, riot and rebellion: popular politics and culture in England 1603-1660 - David Underdown 1985

        Book Recommended

      4. Fire from heaven: life in an English town in the seventeenth century - David Underdown 2003, c1992

        Book Recommended

      5. The state and social change in early modern England, c.1550-1640 - Steve Hindle, Ebooks Corporation Limited 2002

        Book Recommended

      6. Belief and practice in Reformation England: a tribute to Patrick Collinson from his students - Patrick Collinson, Susan Wabuda, C. J. Litzenberger 1998

        Book Recommended See Walsham chapter, ‘“A Glose of Godlines”: Philip Stubbes, Elizabethan Grub Street and the invention of Puritanism’. For an example of Stubbes's writing, see The Anatomie of Abuses below.

      7. The Anatomie of Abuses - Philip Stubbes 1583

        Book Further A classic diatribe against popular recreations.

      8. The Caroline Captivity of the Church - Julian Davies 01/10/1992

        Book Recommended See chapter 5, The Book of Sports

      9. Popular culture in early modern Europe - Burke, Peter. 1978.

        Book Recommended For European background into the broader phenomenon of reformation of manners.

      10. An ungovernable people: the English and their law in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries - John Brewer, John A. Styles 1980

        Book Recommended See Wrightson chapter, ‘Two concepts of order’

    5. 5. What does quantitative analysis of wills reveal about the progress of the Reformation in sixteenth-century England? 10 items
      1. This question is more specialised than the others, considering a method some historians have used to study changing religious beliefs. Since the 1960s, the value of analysing the spiritual preambles found in last wills and testaments has been debated, e.g. by Marsh, Litzenberger, and Spufford. See Library Reading List and Moodle Bibliography, section 3.1. To contextualise, also read at least one book on the English Reformation from Moodle Bibliography, sections 1 and 2 (or Background Reading on Library Reading List).

      2. Religion and the English people, 1500-1640: new voices, new perspectives - Eric Josef Carlson 1998

        Book Recommended See chapters by Litzenberger and Marsh. Details of other versions of these chapters are provided below.

      3. The English Reformation and the laity: Gloucestershire, 1540-1580 - C. J. Litzenberger 1997

        Book Recommended

      4. Contrasting communities: English villagers in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries - Margaret Spufford 1974

        Book Recommended See ch. 13, The Reality of Religion for the Villager

      5. The beginnings of English Protestantism - Peter Marshall, Alec Ryrie 2002

        Book Recommended See ch. 4, Ryrie, 'Counting sheep, counting shepherds'. Available online.

      6. Other versions of these chapters 4 items
        1. Local responses to changes in religious policy based on evidence from Gloucestershire wills (1540–1580) - Caroline Litzenberger

          Document Recommended Alternative version of chapter published in Religion and the English People

        2. When death do us part: understanding and interpreting the probate records of early modern England - Tom Arkell, Nesta Evans, Nigel Goose 2000

          Book Recommended See ch. 7, by M Spufford, for alternative version of her chapter in Contrasting Communities.

        3. The Records of the nation: the Public Record Office, 1838-1988 : the British Record Society, 1888-1988 - G. H. Martin, Peter Spufford, British Record Society, Great Britain. Public Record Office 1990

          Book Recommended Another version of the Marsh article from Religion and the English People, here with title, "In the name of God". This is in the Level 8 Annexe, so difficult to find, but it can't be checked out, so should usually be available.

        4. The scribes of villagers' wills in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and their influence - Margaret Spufford

          Document Recommended Another version of the Spufford chapter, available online.

  15. Essay 2 28 items
    An article or book chapter is suggested for each topic. Read this first to help you think about about why I have asked this question. See the Bibliography in Moodle for suggestions for further reading.
    1. 1. Did puritanism change between 1600 and 1640, and if so how and why? 5 items
      Tip: The Webster article stresses variety and complexity, and tends to jump around a bit, both of which make it difficult to follow. However, the section headings are useful to identifying the main themes. Although the dates are 1600-1640, it is OK to start by thinking about puritanism under Elizabeth, starting with Archbishop Whitgift's requirement in 1583 that all clergymen subscribe support to the settlement and liturgy.
      1. The Cambridge Companion to Puritanism 2008

        Book Essential See ch. 3, Tom Webster, Early Stuart Puritanism

      2. The culture of English puritanism, 1560-1700 - Christopher Durston, Jacqueline Eales 1996

        Book Recommended As an alternative to Webster, read ch. 5, P Lake, 'A charitable Christian hatred', or other chapters from this collection. Chapter 5 is available online.

      3. The Ecclesiastical Policy of King James I - Kenneth Fincham, Peter Lake 1985

        Article Recommended

      4. The origins of the English Civil War - Conrad Russell 1973

        Book Recommended See ch. 4, Puritanism, Arminianism and Counter-Revolution, available online.

      5. English puritanism 1603-1689 - John Spurr 1998

        Book Recommended

    2. 2. To what extent can the English Civil War be described as a war about culture? 4 items
      Tip: Culture is a short-hand for "popular culture", so look also at reading on the Reformation of Manners and the Book of Sports. (Best to avoid this question if you wrote your first essay on the Reformation of Manners.)
      1. Revel, riot and rebellion: popular politics and culture in England 1603-1660 - David Underdown 1985

        Book Recommended See especially chapters 1-4, 7. I am asking for ch. 3 to be digitised. Chapter 3 (pp.44-72) available online.

    3. 3. How strong is the evidence for popular support for the Prayer Book and Laudianism before the Civil Wars? 5 items
      Tip: The logical implication of Christopher Haigh's argument for "residual Catholicism" within the Church is that there was popular support for Laudianism, However, Haigh is an historian of the Reformation, and not of the Civil Wars, so you can't rely too much on him. If you wrote your first essay on whether clergy can be trusted, don't re-use the same material in this essay.
      1. Prayer book and people in Elizabethan and early Stuart England - Judith D. Maltby c1998

        Book Recommended The Introduction, pp. 1-30 is available online, but the whole book is relevant to this question.

      2. Altars restored: the changing face of English religious worship, 1547-c.1700 - Kenneth Fincham, Nicholas Tyacke, Oxford University Press 2007 (electronic resource)

        Book Recommended See chapters covering period from 1625-1640, especially ch. 6.

    4. 4. Success or failure, which better describes Godly Rule in 1642-1660? 5 items
      Tip: This is a huge question, which could be addressed in terms of religious reform or moral reform, or indeed both. (It was addressed in the week 9 lecture, but don't just reproduce this.) How did Puritans want to reform the Church of England in the late 16th and early 17th century? If you decide to look at moral reform, don't forget the Hutton book.
      1. England's Culture Wars - Bernard Capp 09/08/2012

        Book Essential Read the Introduction.

      2. Religion in revolutionary England - Christopher Durston, Judith D. Maltby 2006

        Book Recommended Including chapter on Lord's Day

      3. The rise and fall of merry England: the ritual year, 1400-1700 - Ronald Hutton, Oxford University Press 1994 (electronic resource)

        Book Recommended

      4. The culture of English puritanism, 1560-1700 - Christopher Durston, Jacqueline Eales 1996

        Book Recommended See ch. 7

      5. Cromwell's major-generals: Godly government during the English Revolution - Christopher Durston 2001

        Book Further

    5. 5. Is Civil War iconoclasm better explained by short-term or long-term factors? 5 items
      Tip: Dip into Aston to find out her answer to the question, then decide whether you (and other scholars) agree. Spraggon looks at the Civil Wars, but I've added Collinson and Hamling to give other views on images.
      1. Broken idols of the English Reformation - Margaret Aston, Askews & Holts Library Services 2016

        Book Essential Read the Conclusion to get started, and then selectively. This is a massive book, so don't try to read it all.

      2. Puritan iconoclasm during the English Civil War - Julie Spraggon, Ebooks Corporation Limited 2003

        Book Recommended

      3. England's iconoclasts: Vol. 1- - Margaret Aston 1988-

        Book Recommended

    6. 6. Why did the religious Presbyterians object so strongly to religious Independents in the 1640s? 4 items
      Tip: Look first at Hughes to determine her answer to the question. (The lecture in week 9 also included some material on this question.)
      1. Gangraena and the Struggle for the English Revolution - Ann Hughes 23/09/2004

        Book Essential Read the Introduction

      2. Religion in revolutionary England - Christopher Durston, Judith D. Maltby 2006

        Book Recommended Including chapters on radical religion, sects.

      3. Fear, myth and history: the Ranters and the historians - J. C. Davis 1986

        Book Further See esp. ch. 5.

  16. Reading on other topics 22 items
    1. The Rise of Sects 6 items
      1. Before the Revolution separatism from the English church was almost unthinkable.  But the 1640s saw a rapid growth in Independent churches and radical religious sects, such as the Baptists and Quakers.  Is the growth of such churches evidence of the vitality of popular protestantism, or a reaction against puritanism?  How can the violent response to such groups be explained? Were sects like the Ranters merely constructed from the fears of religious conservatives?

      2. Religion and society in early modern England: a sourcebook - David Cressy, Lori Anne Ferrell 2007

        Book Further Read pp. 227-232

      3. Religion and society in early modern England: a sourcebook - David Cressy, Lori Anne Ferrell 2007

        Book Further Read pp. 234-238

    2. 5. Foxe's Acts and Monuments 6 items
      Much of the reading for this question is provided through journal articles, which you can find through searching the Library catalogue, and in the online essays, to which a link is provided. Make sure to read a few pages from the online Foxe, e.g. pages from chapters 11 to 12 in the 1583 edition, to get a flavour of the text. See the Moodle for advice on reading Foxe online.
      1. Fires of faith: Catholic England under Mary Tudor - Eamon Duffy, Ebooks Corporation Limited 2009

        Book Recommended

      2. Charitable hatred: tolerance and intolerance in England, 1500-1700 - Alexandra Walsham c2006

        Book Recommended

    3. Sacred Space 10 items
      1. Discussion questions:

        • How did the Reformation change the nature of the church as sacred space?
        • Given these changes, did the church remain sacred?

      2. Popular politics and the English Reformation - Shagan, Ethan H., 1971- c2003

        Book Further Read ch. 5. Also available as physical book from GUL.

      3. The impact of the English Reformation, 1500-1640 - Peter Marshall 1997

        Book Further See: R Hutton, 'The local impact of the Tudor Reformations'. Available online.

      4. The stripping of the altars: traditional religion in England c.1400-c.1580 - Eamon Duffy c2005

        Book Further See ch. 14.

      5. The parish in English life, 1400-1600 - Katherine L. French, Gary G. Gibbs, Beat A. Kümin c1997

        Book Further See E Duffy, 'The parish, piety and patronage in late medieval East Anglia - the evidence of roodscreens'

      6. The early Stuart church, 1603-1642 - Kenneth Fincham 1993

        Book Further Read ch.7, P Lake, 'The Laudian Style'