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  1. Semester I - Reformation 163 items
    1. Background Reading 13 items
      1. English Reformation 6 items
        In the first semester we will consider reactions to the implementation of the Reformation, primarily in the later sixteenth century. You should read ONE of the following textbooks to familiarise yourself with the background
        1. English reformations: religion, politics, and society under the Tudors - Christopher Haigh, American Council of Learned Societies 1993 (electronic resource)

          Book Recommended

        2. The Age of Reformation: The Tudor and Stewart Realms 1485-1603 - Alec Ryrie, Ebooks Corporation Limited 2013

          Book Recommended Chapters on England

        3. The stripping of the altars: traditional religion in England c.1400-c.1580 - Eamon Duffy c2005

          Book Recommended See part I for religion before the Reformation, part II for the Reformation

        4. Reformation England, 1480-1642 - Peter Marshall 2003

          Book Further Good on historiography

        5. The later Reformation in England, 1547-1603 - Diarmaid MacCulloch c1990

          Book Further

        6. Reformation: Europe's house divided, 1490-1700 - Diarmaid MacCulloch 2003, c2004

          Book Further An excellent (but long) overview of European Reformation. Use contents or index to find sections on England.

      2. Society and Politics 6 items
        1. The Elizabethan world - Susan Doran, Norman L. Jones 2011

          Book Essential This recent book includes 37 chapters on different aspects of Tudor (and Stuart) England, written by specialists. The chapters provide concise summaries of key issues for understanding the period, and include helpful bibliographies. Especially recommended are the following chapters: 7, Parliament (Dean); 8, Centre and Localities (Cooper); 9, Parish Government* (French); 12, Church structures* (Usher); 16, Social Hierarchies (Amussen); 17, Nobility and gentry (Dickinson); 26, Rural economies under stress (Hoyle). There are also chapters on religion and popular culture (chapters 13-15, 27). Chapters on the family and government are also of interest, among many others. (The starred chapters are being digitised.) Chapters 9 and 12 available online.

        2. English society, 1580-1680 - Keith Wrightson 2003

          Book Recommended Especially chapter 1, Degrees of People. An alternative to Amussen chapter in The Elizabethan World.

        3. Poverty and piety in an English village: Terling, 1525-1700 - Keith Wrightson, David Levine, Oxford University Press 1995 (electronic resource)

          Book Recommended Read the Introduction for an overview of social, cultural and demographic change in rural parishes.

        4. The middling sort of people: culture, society and politics in England, 1550-1800 - Jonathan Barry, C. W. Brooks c1994

          Book Recommended See chapter 1, Wrightson, "Sorts of People". An alternative to the Amussen chapter in The Elizabeth World.

        5. The state and social change in early modern England, c.1550-1640 - Steve Hindle, Ebooks Corporation Limited 2002

          Book Recommended See chapter 1, Introduction.

        6. Crime in early modern England 1550-1750 - J. A. Sharpe 1999

          Book Recommended See chapters 2 and 4.

      3. Bibliography 1 item
        1. Brepolis: Bibliography of British and Irish History

          Webpage Recommended Indispensible online resources for finding reading on topics in British history.

    2. Week 1: Success and Failure 7 items
      1. The 3-5 session will be devoted to close study of an article by Christopher Haigh, who has been one of the leading writers on the Reformation in recent years.  To prepare, write a brief outline of the article.  The article is broken into sections, with a roman numeral starting each section.  Your outline should answer two questions for each section: (1) what is the main point of this section, as summarised in a single sentence or quotation? (2) what is the primary type of evidence used in this section?  Further reading provides historiographical and source-based context.  Don't forget the section before the first roman numeral.

      2. Further reading 5 items
        1. Religion and society in early modern England: a sourcebook - David Cressy, Lori Anne Ferrell c2005

          Book Further See Thomas Becon's New Catechism and Alexander Nowell's Catechism

        2. Success and Failure in the German Reformation - Gerald Strauss 1975

          Article Further The Strauss article provided a model for the argument and methodology employed by Haigh.

    3. Week 2: Debate over the Reformation 16 items
      1. Christopher Haigh has been one of the most prominent of the historians who have come to be known as "revisionists".  Haigh's initial research was on Catholics, but he moved on to look at the Church more broadly, exploring the interrelationships between Catholicism and Protestantism.  This week we will read several of Haigh's publications, to see how he draws connections between different issues.

         

        Read all of the essential reading and at least one of the recommended readings by Haigh.  As you read, pay particular attention to how he uses evidence from primary sources to support his core arguments.

         

        Further reading is available, including that of Eamon Duffy, another of the revisionists, and some of their critics (sometimes called "post-revisionists").

      2. Christopher Haigh 8 items
        1. The reign of Elizabeth I. - Christopher Haigh 1984

          Book Essential Read ch. 8, The Church of England, the Catholics and the People. Available online.

        2. The plain man's pathways to heaven: kinds of Christianity in post-Reformation England, 1570-1640 - Christopher Haigh, Oxford University Press 2007 (electronic resource)

          Book Essential Read ch. 10, Enemies of the Godly

        3. Anticlericalism and the English Reformation - Christopher Haigh 10/1983

          Article Recommended

        4. English reformations: religion, politics, and society under the Tudors - Christopher Haigh, American Council of Learned Societies 1993 (electronic resource)

          Book Recommended esp. chapters 1, 2, 10

      3. Further reading 7 items
        1. The stripping of the altars: traditional religion in England, c.1400-c.1580 - Eamon Duffy c1992

          Book Recommended esp. chapters 3, 13

        2. The Myth of the English Reformation (History Today) - MacCulloch, Diarmaid 1991

          Article Recommended

        3. The English Reformation - A. G. Dickens 1989

          Book Recommended esp. chapters 1, 2, 5. Any edition is OK.

        4. The Myth of the English Reformation - Diarmaid MacCulloch 1991

          Article Further Longer version of History Today article.

        5. The Age of Reformation: The Tudor and Stewart Realms 1485-1603 - Alec Ryrie, Ebooks Corporation Limited 2013

          Book Further chapters 5, 6

        6. Reformation England, 1480-1642 - Peter Marshall 2003

          Book Further esp chapters 1, 3

        7. The debate on the English Reformation - Rosemary O'Day 1986

          Book Further chapter 6

    4. Week 3: Popular Culture 31 items
      1. Since Peter Burke published Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe (in 1978), the term 'popular culture' has been contested by historians.  This seminar will introduce the concept and discuss its meanings.  To prepare you should do the essential reading (Harris and Stubbes), at least one of the recommended secondary readings, and at least one ballad.

         

        Come to class with one "gobbet" or extract from a secondary or primary source that raises issues you think we should discuss.

         

        Discussion questions:

        • what was popular culture, and how did it differ from other forms of culture?
        • who participated in popular culture?
        • what issues should historians consider when using printed materials to study popular culture?

         

         

      2. Background 1 item
        The following introduction to English society is also recommended.
        1. English society, 1580-1680 - Keith Wrightson 2003

          Book Recommended Chapter 1, Degrees of people

      3. Secondary reading 12 items
        1. Popular culture in England, c.1500-1850 - Tim Harris 1995

          Book Essential Ch. 1, 'Problematising popular culture', available online.

        2. Popular culture in early modern Europe - Peter Burke, American Council of Learned Societies 1978 (electronic resource)

          Book Recommended See especially Prologue, ch. 2 (pp. 23-29), ch .3

        3. Oral and literate culture in England, 1500-1700 - Adam Fox, Oxford University Press 2000 (electronic resource)

          Book Recommended Esp. Introduction.

        4. Popular cultures in England, 1550-1750 - Barry Reay 1998

          Book Further

        5. Print and Protestantism in early modern England - I. M. Green, Oxford University Press 2000 (electronic resource)

          Book Further Read chapter 8, The Publishers and the People

        6. Culture and politics in early Stuart England - Kevin Sharpe, Peter Lake 1994

          Chapter Further See chapter 10, Deeds against Nature, pp. 257-283. Available online.

        7. PURITANISM, ARMINIANISM AND A SHROPSHIRE AXE-MURDER: Midland History: Vol 15, No 1 - Peter Lake

          Article Further Alternative reading to 'Deeds against Nature' chapter in Culture and Politics in Early Stuart England

        8. Alehouses and good fellowship in early modern England - Mark Hailwood 2014

          Book Further

      4. Sources 17 items
        1. The Anatomie of Abuses - Philip Stubbes

          Book Essential This book is unpaginated, so the following reading uses the image numbers if you download it as a pdf file (with 128 images). Read images 92-98 and 110-118. The treatise is clearly written as an attack on popular customs, but try to read this as a source of information about popular celebrations and recreations.

        2. Ballads 9 items
          Broadside ballads represent one common form of 'cheap print'. They are available through the England Broadside Ballads Archive at the University of California at Santa Barbara (although some come from the University of Glasgow's Euing Collection). The ballads are selected from those Tessa Watt has identified as persistent sellers in the early 17th century. I have included examples of religious ballads, such as the Christian's ABC, the gripping tales, such as the Dutchesse of Suffolkes Calamity. The best way to view them is to choose to zoom to the full page. You can see the original broadside, or a transcribed facsimile, and you also can hear a sung performance. Feel free to search for other broadside ballads, by looking for keywords in the title.
          1. Cheap print and popular piety, 1550-1640 - Tessa Watt 1991

            Book Recommended This book provides contextual information about the following sources.

        3. Murder pamphlets and Providential literature 6 items
          All of these texts come from the Historical Texts website, which includes all of the material, but works a little differently. The links will take you straight to a PDF file, which you can download or read onscreen. I have not been able to set up links to transcripts, but these *can* be viewed in the website itself, if you search for the pamphlet in Historical Texts.
          1. Culture and politics in early Stuart England - Kevin Sharpe, Peter Lake 1994

            Chapter Recommended See chapter 10, Deeds against Nature, by Peter Lake. Available online.

          2. Providence in early modern England - Alexandra Walsham, Oxford University Press c1999 (electronic resource)

            Book Recommended Especially chapter 1

          3. Cry and Revenge of Blood - Thomas Cooper

            Book Further Read selectively. The Contents, chapter 2 (pages 14-15) and chapter 4 will give you a flavour of the pamphlet. If you want to read about the murder, that's in chapter 3!

          4. The Theatre of Gods Judgements (1612)

            Book Further Largely reprinted from a French version, and covering a wide range of "judgements" from ancient to early modern. Suggested reading: Preface and pages 536-542, on workings of providence. Also, read the chapter containing one of the following pages, which offer English examples: 178, 207, 212-13, 294, 302. Note: page numbers are taken from the original; these are different from the page numbers given in EEBO/Historical Texts.

    5. Week 4: The Church Courts and Discipline 14 items
      1. This seminar will introduce the church courts, the primary means by which religious and moral discipline was imposed in early modern England.  We will focus particularly on the visitation courts, using examples from Nottingham and Norfolk, providing an overview of the types of cases appearing before the courts, for both religious and moral offenses, and learn about court procedure.

         

        Questions: What do church courts reveal about religion and morality in sixteenth-century England, and how much can we trust this picture?

         

        Required:  Read the following sources and TWO of the recommended readings.  Some resources are available from Moodle. Ingram provides the best introduction to how the courts worked, and Helmholz provides further information.  Vage and Spaeth give a flavour of the kinds of cases that appeared.  Hill discusses contemporary criticisms of the courts.

      2. Archdeaconry of Nottingham Presentment Bills - Catalog Search

        Webpage Essential Nottingham presentment bills are located by searching the University of Nottingham catalogue. Search for Document reference "AN/PB 292" to start. For more detailed guidance on searching, see separate instructions on Moodle. You should read through at least 20 presentment bills, choosing either those from one year or those from one place over a period of 20 years. Count the number of presentments for different offences, e.g. for failure to attend church, clerical non-residence, and fornication or adultery. You may choose to focus on one or two offences or on a wider range. Come to class prepared to share these results as a table, and with one example of a presentment for us to discuss.

      3. Archdeaconry of Nottingham introduction - The University of Nottingham

        Webpage Recommended Background information on the Nottingham Presentment Bills

      4. Documentary Annals of the Reformed Church of England: Being a Collection of ... - Edward Cardwell - Google Books - Edward Cardwell

        Book Essential Injunctions of Queen Elizabeth 1559, in E Cardwell, Documentary Annals of the Reformed Church of England (Oxford, 1844), vol. 2, from p. 210, available from Google Books. Familiarise yourself with the contents. It is not necessary to read the whole document, but read enough to form an impression of its contents

      5. Church courts, sex and marriage in England, 1570-1640 - Martin Ingram 1987

        Book Recommended See chapters 1 (esp. pages 27-58), 7, 11. Chapter 1 available online. See also link to Google books version.

      6. Church courts, sex and marriage in England, 1570-1640 - Martin Ingram 1987

        Book Essential Read for Thursday class. Read pp. 323-327 (through Google books) and pp. 329, 340-363 (on Moodle).

      7. Society and Puritanism in pre-revolutionary England - Christopher Hill 1969

        Book Recommended chs. 8, The Bawdy Court, ch. 10, The Rusty Sword of the Church

      8. The rise and fall of the English ecclesiastical courts, 1500-1860 - R. B. Outhwaite 2006

        Book Recommended

      9. Domestic Dangers - Laura Gowing 26/11/1998

        Book Further See ch. 7, Narratives of Litigation

      10. Fiction in the archives: pardon tales and their tellers in sixteenth-century France - Natalie Zemon Davis 1987

        Book Further Available in GUL at both Level 8 (History LJ300 DAV) and Level 9 Annexe (French C613 DAV)

      11. The Church under the law: justice, administration and discipline in the diocese of York, 1560-1640 - Ronald A. Marchant 1969

        Book Further ch. 6, Church Discipline (available from tutor). A classic volume on the effectiveness of church courts, but hard going.

    6. Week 5: Ministers and People 13 items
      1. This week will consider the use of court evidence to reconstruct parish conflicts over religion, and especially quarrels between ministers and their congregations.  In the background is the literature over anticlericalism.

         

        Question:  How important were religious differences in explaining disagreements between  ministers and their congregations?

      2. Copies of the following sources will be provided via the course Moodle.

        • Presentments from Deanery of Breccles in Archdeaconry of Norwich. Read evidence from one of parishes of Tottingham, Kerbrooke, and Ovington.
        • Letter from John Trendell of Ovington

      3. Anticlericalism in Britain c.1500-1914 - Nigel Aston, Matthew Cragoe c2000

        Book Further

      4. The Clergy 5 items
        1. The Catholic priesthood and the English Reformation - Peter Marshall, Oxford University Press 1994 (electronic resource)

          Book Further

    7. Week 6: Implementation and Reception 21 items
      1. Some historians have questioned over-reliance on court records, arguing that they highlight conflict and the atypical.  Are there other local sources which can reveal the views of those who were not necessarily prosecuted for their failure to conform?  Historians have used two sources for this purpose, last wills and testaments and churchwardens' accounts.  This week, we will look at both of these sources.

         

         

      2. Background 1 item
        1. The Elizabethan world - Susan Doran, Norman L. Jones 2011

          Book Recommended Chapter 7, Parish government, by HR French. Or read one of the articles on churchwardens listed below, by Carlson and Foster.

      3. Churchwardens' accounts 8 items
        1. In the first hour, we will look at churchwardens' accounts, detailed records of what was spent by the parish each year, which John Craig suggests give a more reliable picture of the work of churchwardens than presentments do.  We will concentrate mostly on the articles, but look at the examples of the accounts in Cressy and Ferrell.

           

          Question:  What do churchwardens' accounts reveal about parish life?

        2. The local impact of the English Reformation - Ronald Hutton

          Chapter Essential Also available in Haigh, The English Reformation Revised (see below).

        3. Religion and society in early modern England: a sourcebook - David Cressy, Lori Anne Ferrell c2005

          Book Essential See pages 35-39 and 78-81 for examples of churchwardens' accounts.

        4. The English Reformation revised - Christopher Haigh 1987

          Book Recommended Alternative source for Hutton, The local impact of the English Reformation

        5. The parish in English life, 1400-1600 - Katherine L. French, Gary G. Gibbs, Beat A. Kümin c1997

          Book Further See Foster, "Churchwardens' accounts of early modern England and Wales: Some problems to note but much to be gained", for background on work of churchwardens

        6. The world of rural dissenters, 1520-1725 - Margaret Spufford 1995

          Book Further See Carlson, "The origins, function, and status of the office of churchwardens", for more background on churchwardens.

      4. Last wills and testaments 11 items
        1. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, it was customary for last wills and testaments to include a preamble in which the testator bequeathed his or her soul.  Some historians have argued that these can be used to assess support for the Reformation, but others have been more sceptical, suggesting that other bequests are more revealing.

           

          Question: Can wills be used to reveal popular beliefs?

        2. Sources 2 items
          1. Sample will preambles covering the sixteenth century are available either from (1) transcribed Northamptonshire wills on the course Moodle, or (2) the following printed collection, available on Level 8 of GUL. The latter book is 'reference only', so you may not take it out of the Library. Please return to the shelf when finished so others can use it.

             

            Whichever source you use, you should try to categorise a sample of preambles in order to assess whether the deceased was Protestant or Catholic.  Come prepared to report how this changed over time and to defend your method of classification.

          2. Swaledale wills and inventories, 1522-1600 - Elizabeth K. Berry, Yorkshire Archaeological Society 1998

            Book Recommended as alternative to Northamptonshire wills

        3. Secondary reading 8 items
          1. Religion and the English people, 1500-1640: new voices, new perspectives - Eric Josef Carlson 1998

            Book Essential See: Articles by Marsh and Litzenberger. These can be read either in this volume or as separate articles in the journal, Continuity and Change, and the Records of the Nation volume (listed below). The separate articles are different versions of the same material.

          2. Contrasting communities: English villagers in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries - Margaret Spufford 1974

            Book Recommended See: The reality of religion for the villager available online. Spufford adopts a clever methodology to address some of the problems of preambles.

          3. Local responses to changes in religious policy based on evidence from Gloucestershire wills (1540–1580) - Caroline Litzenberger 12/1993

            Article Recommended Read in place of the Litzenberger article in Religion and the English People

          4. The Records of the nation: the Public Record Office, 1838-1988 : the British Record Society, 1888-1988 - G. H. Martin, Peter Spufford, British Record Society, Great Britain 1990

            Book Recommended Read in place of the Marsh article in Religion and the English People.

          5. The beginnings of English Protestantism - Peter Marshall, Alec Ryrie 2002

            Book Recommended Read A Ryrie, ‘Counting sheep, counting shepherds: the problem of allegiance in the English Reformation’ available online.

          6. The English Reformation and the laity: Gloucestershire, 1540-1580 - C. J. Litzenberger 1997

            Book Recommended Book-length study of wills and other sources from Gloucestershire.

          7. The stripping of the altars: traditional religion in England c.1400-c.1580 - Eamon Duffy c2005

            Book Further chapter 15, The Impact of Reform: Wills

    8. Week 7: Puritanism 10 items
      1. Puritanism is a key concept throughout the course.  The writings of Collinson and Lake have been central to a re-thinking of the concept.  To prepare for class, read the sources and at least the article by Lake. The recommended reading will provide more background on puritans and puritanism.

         

        Questions:  Puritan or Protestant, which word better describes supporters of reform? What was a Puritan? Should we abandon the word?

      2. Sources 4 items
        1. Nichols, Josias, The Plea of the Innocent (London, 1602)

          Book Essential Read images 11-21 (pages 1-21 ), 119-123 (pages 212-208, due to errors in numbering)

        2. Puritan manifestoes. A study of the origin of the Puritan revolt. With a reprint of the Admonition to the Parliament and kindred documents, 1572 1907

          Document Essential The link will download a pdf version of the book. Read a View of Popish Abuses pages 20-37 (starting from image 54).

        3. The diary of Samuel Rogers, 1634-1638 - Samuel Rogers, Tom Webster, Kenneth Shipps, Church of England Record Society 2004

          Book Essential Read pp. 1-8 available online.

        4. Peel, A Seconde Parte of a Register, on course Moodle

          Webpage Essential Read Supplication to Parliament, pp. 70-72, 76-78.

      3. Secondary reading 5 items
        1. The culture of English puritanism, 1560-1700 - Christopher Durston, Jacqueline Eales 1996

          Book Essential Read P Lake, ‘“A charitable Christian hatred”: the godly and their enemies in the 1630s’, available online. Introduction is also recommended.

        2. English puritanism 1603-1689 - John Spurr 1998

          Book Recommended

        3. The Elizabethan Puritan movement - Patrick Collinson, Oxford University Press 1990 (electronic resource)

          Book Recommended

    9. Week 8: Reading week 0 items
      No class - essay due
    10. Week 9: Polemic and propaganda in the Elizabethan Church 10 items
      1. To set the stage for next semester, we will consider the first significant propaganda battle between puritans and the Church in 1588-1593: the Marprelate Tracts and Bishop Richard Bancroft's attack on the 'consistorian conspiracy'.

         

        Questions: 

        • It is clear that the Marprelate Tracts and Bancroft's Dangerous Conspiracy are polemical works.  With this in mind, what can be learned about puritanism from them?  In considering this question, you may wish to concentrate on either Marprelate or Bancroft.
        • How important are story telling and evidence to either Marprelate or Bancroft?

         

      2. Sources 3 items
        1. Daungerous positions and proceedings: published and practised within the iland of Brytaine, vnder pretence of reformation, and for the presbiteriall discipline - Richard Bancroft 1593 (electronic resource)

          Book Essential Facsimile of original publication available from Historical Texts. Read images 1 (c0ver), 3 and 4 (table of contents), then pages 1-7 (Book I, chapter 1), 32-36 (end of Book I, chapter 6, and start Book II, chapter 1), 75-85 (Book III, chapter 5), 109-11 (part of Book III, chapter 13), 125-128 (Book III, chapter 16), 176-183 Book IV, chapter 15); pages 37-41 are optional.

        2. Course Moodle for reading from Marprelate Tracts

          Webpage Essential The link has been corrected so that it now points to this year's Moodle, rather than last year's. See week 9, Polemic and Propaganda.

      3. Secondary reading 6 items
        1. Richard Bancroft and Elizabethan anti-Puritanism - Patrick Collinson, Askews & Holts Library Services 2013

          Book Recommended See: esp. chapters 5 and 6

    11. Week 10: Puritans and the People 9 items
      1. The Puritans were convinced that their efforts to bring Protestantism to their congregations were unproductive.  This seminar will look in more detail at the puritan sources.

         

        Question: Do puritan sources about popular belief tell us more about puritans or the people?

      2. Sources 2 items
        1. The plaine mans path-way to heauen - Dent, Arthur 1603 (ESTC 6627)

          Book Essential Read images 1 (title page), 6-8 (pages 1-4), 17-22 (pages 23-32), 129-133 (pages 244-53), 161-166 (pages 309-318).

        2. Religion and society in early modern England: a sourcebook - David Cressy, Lori Anne Ferrell, Ebooks Corporation Limited 1996 (electronic resource)

          Book Further See George Gifford, Country Divinity, pages 99-104

      3. Secondary reading 6 items
        1. The plain man's pathways to heaven: kinds of Christianity in post-Reformation England, 1570-1640 - Christopher Haigh, Oxford University Press 2007 (electronic resource)

          Book Essential especially Introduction, chapters 1-4

        2. Church courts, sex and marriage in England, 1570-1640 - Martin Ingram 1987

          Book Recommended See ch. 3, Religion and the People

    12. Week 11: Reformation of Manners 19 items
      1. The relationship between Puritanism/Protestantism and popular culture is usually portrayed as antagonistic.  Texts like the Anatomie of Abuses, considered earlier in the course, appear to support a case for opposition.  This week we will consider the reasons for Protestant opposition to popular recreations, the extent to which such opposition can be described as Puritan, and the relative importance of religious, economic and political factors in explaining the campaign for the reformation of manners.

         

      2. Secondary reading 11 items
        1. Revel, riot and rebellion: popular politics and culture in England 1603-1660 - David Underdown 1985

          Book Essential Read chapters 2-3

        2. The culture of English puritanism, 1560-1700 - Christopher Durston, Jacqueline Eales 1996

          Book Recommended Read ch. 1, Elizabethan and Jacobean Puritanism as Forms of Popular Culture

        3. Belief and practice in Reformation England: a tribute to Patrick Collinson from his students - Patrick Collinson, Susan Wabuda, C. J. Litzenberger 1998

          Book Recommended See Alexandra Walsham, "'A Glose of Godlines': Philip Stubbes, Elizabethan Grub Street and the invention of Puritanism", pages 177-206

        4. The rise and fall of merry England: the ritual year, 1400-1700 - Ronald Hutton, Oxford University Press 1994 (electronic resource)

          Book Recommended Especially chapters 4-5

        5. Poverty and piety in an English village: Terling, 1525-1700 - Keith Wrightson, David Levine, Oxford University Press 1995 (electronic resource)

          Book Recommended Especially chapters 5 and 7

        6. The state and social change in early modern England, c.1550-1640 - Steve Hindle, Ebooks Corporation Limited 2002

          Book Recommended Chapter 7. Now available as ebook.

        7. Order and disorder in early modern England - Anthony J. Fletcher, John Stevenson 1985

          Book Recommended See ch. 1, M Spufford, Puritanism and Social Control. Selections of this chapter may also be available on Google Books.

        8. Fire from heaven: life in an English town in the seventeenth century - David Underdown 2003, c1992

          Book Further

      3. Sources 7 items
        1. The doctrine of the sabbath

          Book Essential A long and repetitive tract. To get a flavour, see pages 1-2, 57-58, 69, 85, 89-94, 102-109, 117-118, 129-135, 240-242. (Link repaired)

        2. The faith, doctrine, and religion, professed, & protected in the realme of England, and dominions of the same expressed in 39 articles .... - Thomas Rogers

          Book Essential Read in the Preface from the end of the paragraph that begins with 20 to just before the paragraph that begins with 24. If you read thus online, it is pages 18-21. If you download as a pdf file, it is pages 9-11.

        3. Religion and society in early modern England: a sourcebook - David Cressy, Lori Anne Ferrell, Ebooks Corporation Limited 1996 (electronic resource)

          Book Further Read pages 145-155

  2. Archive 8 items
    1. The Reformation in Sources 8 items
      1. Reading: Read at least the sources marked 'Essential'.  You should also be reading one of the textbooks listed in the Background section above.

         

        Question:  Assess the vitality and popularity of the church before and after the Reformation.

      2. Religion and society in early modern England: a sourcebook - David Cressy, Lori Anne Ferrell c2005

        Book Essential Read ‘The State of Melford Church as I, Roger Martyn, Did Know It’; ‘Robert Parkyn’s Narrative of the Reformation’ ; ‘Hugh Latimer, Convocation sermon, 1536’; and ‘Accounts and Inventories of St. Edmund’s Parish, Salisbury’.

      3. Religion and society in early modern England: a sourcebook - David Cressy, Lori Anne Ferrell c2005

        Book Essential Second edition in book form: Read ‘The State of Melford Church as I, Roger Martyn, Did Know It’; ‘Robert Parkyn’s Narrative of the Reformation’ ; ‘Hugh Latimer, Convocation sermon, 1536’; and ‘Accounts and Inventories of St. Edmund’s Parish, Salisbury’.

      4. The Reformation in England: to the accession of Elizabeth I - A. G. Dickens, Dorothy Carr 1967

        Book Essential pp. 15-19 available online.

      5. Simon Knott, ‘Amazing screens’, Norfolk Churches website

        Webpage Recommended Make sure to follow the parish links to see photographs of the rood screens of the churches.

      6. The stripping of the altars: traditional religion in England c.1400-c.1580 - Eamon Duffy c2005

        Book Recommended Any chapter in part I and Chapter 14, The Impact of Reform: Parishes

      7. Boxford churchwardens' accounts 1530-1561 - Peter Northeast 1982

        Book Recommended

  3. Essay Resources 26 items
    The essay questions, bibliography and some sources are available on the course Moodle. For some questions, there are also links to reading below.
    1. How important was print in the dissemination of Protestant ideas? 0 items
      See week 3 above and the essay questions and readings on Moodle.
    2. To what extent do the inadequacies of the clergy explain the slow spread of Protestantism in Elizabethan England? 8 items
      1.  

        One of the defining issues of puritanism under Elizabethan was a campaign for a preaching ministry. The puritans launched a large-scale campaign to collect information on unpreaching ministers, whom they called 'dumb dogs'. This campaign may be used to study the nature of the clergy, alongside the reading for week 5 on Minister and People and other readings listed in the essay question document on Moodle.

      2. The Seconde parte of a register: being a calendar of manuscripts under that title intended for publication by the Puritans about 1593, and now in Dr Williams's Library, London - Albert Peel, C. H. Firth 1915

        Book Essential Read the survey for one county, choosing from Norfolk (146-56), Essex (156-165), Warwickshire (165-174), or Cornwall (98-110), all in volume 2. You should also read 'Supplication of Norwich Men', vol. 1, pp. 157-60; and A General Supplication made to the Parliament, in The Second Parte of a Register, vol. 2, pp. 70-87, esp. 70-72, 76-78

      3. Proceedings in the parliaments of Elizabeth I - T. E. Hartley 1981-1995

        Book Essential Read vol. 2, pp. 311-19. (pages 9-193, esp. 44, in the same volume, are also relevant, but not required reading)

      4. The Elizabethan Puritan movement - Patrick Collinson, Oxford University Press 1990 (electronic resource)

        Book Essential pp. 243-88 provide the background

      5. Richard Bancroft and Elizabethan anti-Puritanism - Patrick Collinson 2013

        Book Further

      6. Society and religion in Elizabethan England - Richard L. Greaves c1981

        Book Further

      7. The culture of English puritanism, 1560-1700 - Christopher Durston, Jacqueline Eales 1996

        Book Recommended

    3. How effective were the church courts in regulating religious and moral behaviour in late sixteenth and early seventeenth century England? 0 items
      See week 4 above and also Moodle.
    4. How reliable is Foxe’s Acts and Monuments as a source for understanding the spread of the Reformation? 18 items
      1. The Acts and Monuments is a massive source, with the longest editions being over 2000 large pages. Four editions were published in his lifetime, with significant variations between them. We can read only a small portion of this text. There is also plenty of recent scholarship on the volumes.

         

        You should read all of the essential reading, including selections from the source, Thomas Freeman's article and the DNB entry for Foxe. Don't forget to look at the woodcuts as you go past them. If you wish to pursue these further, then see the recommended essay on the illustrations.

         

        Discussion questions:

        • Why was the experience of martyrs so important to Protestants after 1558?
        • Is Foxe's volume best viewed as a history or a source?
        • What was the role of the illustrations? 

         

        Note:  Foxe is difficult to read, especially since printing conventions appear odd to the modern eye. 

        • The letter 'j' often appears as 'i', so 'ioyned' means 'joined'.
        • The letters 'u' and 'v' may be reversed, so 'liues' and 'trauell' mean 'lives' and 'travel'.
        • A line over a letter means that an 'n' or 'm' has been omitted, so 'thē' means 'then'.

      2. Source 1 item
        1. The Acts and Monuments Online

          Website Essential The following reading suggestions were prepared for a seminar. If you are writing an essay on this topic you should read more widely and develop your own line of research through this massive source. (Seminar reading: Read the following from the 1583 edition. The web link will take you to page 1627, and from there you can search for the other pages: martyrdom of John Bradford, from History of the worthy Martyr, modern pages 1627-1631 and 1647-1648; Martyrdome of fiue constant Christians, p. 2077; The seuere punishment of God vpon the persecutours, pp. 2123-2124; The story of one Drayner of Kent and Admonition to the Reader, pp. 2135-2137; The story of one Snell and Laremouth, p. 2173; Conclusion, p. 2177. )

      3. Reading 16 items
        1. Fires of faith: Catholic England under Mary Tudor - Eamon Duffy 2009

          Book Recommended

        2. Elizabethans - Patrick Collinson 2003

          Book Recommended Truth and Legend: The Veracity of John Foxe’s Book of Martyrs

        3. The Acts and Monuments Online: Essays

          Webpage Recommended Esp essay on Foxe as historian.

        4. Charitable hatred: tolerance and intolerance in England, 1500-1700 - Alexandra Walsham c2006

          Book Recommended

        5. Salvation at stake: Christian martyrdom in early modern Europe - Brad S. Gregory 1999

          Book Recommended

        6. Foxe and the book 6 items
          1. Religion and the book in early modern England: the making of Foxe's Book of martyrs - Elizabeth Evenden, Thomas S. Freeman 2011

            Book Further

          2. Tudor books and readers: materiality and the construction of meaning - John N. King 2010

            Book Further

          3. John Foxe and the English Reformation - D. M. Loades c1997

            Book Further

          4. John Foxe at home and abroad - D. M. Loades c2004

            Book Further