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  1. Week 1 What is Cultural Heritage? The Framework. Meaningful Objects Frances Lennard 16 items
    The cultural heritage encompasses sites and historic buildings, moveable heritage and the intangible heritage. This session considers how and by whom cultural heritage is defined, and looks at the work of bodies such as UNESCO and ICCROM in protecting and caring for it. In the second part of the session we will examine the meaning of objects, and the way these meanings have been explored by scholars in a variety of disciplines. Please bring in an object from home that is important to you and be prepared to talk about its meaning for you.
    1. Websites 3 items
    2. Required reading 9 items
      1. Textile conservation: advances in practice - Ebooks Corporation Limited 2010

        Book Essential See Chapter: Gentle, Nicola, "Preserving Information: Two Beds with Textile Hangings Dating from the Seventeenth Century,", pp. 63-69.

      2. Ethics & critical thinking in conservation - American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works 2013

        Book Essential See Chapter: Janowski, James. “Resuscitating Bamiyan’s Buddhas? A Dispatch from Dresden, Two Lessons Learned.”, pp. 49-78.

      3. Companion encyclopedia of anthropology - Tim Ingold, MyiLibrary 2002 (electronic resource)

        Book Essential See Chapter: Miller, Daniel. “Artefacts and the Meaning of Things.”, pp. 396-419.

      4. Researching material culture - Susan M. Pearce, University of Leicester. School of Archaeological Studies 2000

        Book Essential See Chapter: Pearce, Susan. “Researching Material Culture: Introduction.”, pp. 1-6.

      5. Learning from Objects - Julia Porter, Wendy Martin 1985

        Article Essential

      6. Interpreting objects and collections - Taylor & Francis Group 1994

        Book Essential See Chapter 19: Prown, Jules. “Mind in Matter: an Introduction to Material Culture Theory.”, pp. 133-138. Also, available as a journal article at http://ezproxy.lib.gla.ac.uk/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/1180761

      7. The object reader - Fiona Candlin, Raiford Guins c2009

        Book Essential See Chapter: Thomas de la Peña, Carolyn. "Saccharin Sparrow (circa 1955),", pp. 506-509.

      8. Beyond Words - Leora Auslander 10/2005

        Article Essential

    3. Further reading 4 items
      1. Women and the material culture of needlework and textiles, 1750-1950 - Maureen Daly Goggin, Beth Fowkes Tobin c2009

        Book Further See Chapter: Gordon, Beverly and Laurel Horton. “Turn-of-the-Century Quilts: Embodied Objects in a Web of Relationships.”, pp. 93-110.

      2. Heritage Wreckers - Ivo Maroević 1995

        Article Further

      3. American artifacts: essays in material culture - Jules David Prown, Kenneth Haltman c2000

        Book Further See Chapter: Shannon Miller, L. “The Many Figures of Eve: Styles of Womanhood Embodied in a Late-Nineteenth Century Corset.”, pp. 129-147.

      4. Intangible heritage - Laurajane Smith, Natsuko Akagawa, Ebooks Corporation Limited 2009 (electronic resource)

        Book Further

  2. Week 2 Object Biographies - Dinah Eastop, Independent museum and conservation consultant 6 items
    This session will introduce Kopytoff’s concept of object biographies and illustrate its potential as a research tool for documentation and analysis.
    1. Required reading 6 items
      Please read the Kopytoff article and some of the others.
      1. Textiles revealed: object lessons in historic textile and costume research - Mary M. Brooks 2000

        Book Essential See Chapter: Eastop, Dinah. “Textiles as Multiple and Competing Histories.”, pp. 17-28.

      2. Handbook of material culture - Ebooks Corporation Limited 2006

        Book Essential See Chapter: Eastop, Dinah. “Conservation as Material Culture.”, pp. 516-533.

      3. Hidden Histories - L. Gascoigne 2006

        Article Essential You can access the online version of Museum Practice by following the instruction at http://encore.lib.gla.ac.uk/iii/encore/record/C__Rb2857777

      4. The social life of things: commodities in cultural perspective - Arjun Appadurai, American Council of Learned Societies, Ethnohistory Workshop, Symposium on the Relationship between Commodities and Culture 2013 (electronic resource)

        Book Essential See Chapter: Kopytoff, I. “The Cultural Biography of Things: Commoditization as Process.”, pp. 64-91.

      5. The art of the conservator - W. A. Oddy, British Museum. Trustees 1992

        Book Essential See Chapter: Oddy, Andrew. “‘Introduction.”, pp. 7-27.

      6. The Dematerialization of Culture and the De-accessioning of Museum Collections - Bruno S. Frey, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett 12/2002

        Article Essential

  3. Week 3 The Skull of Confuscius. Nick Pearce, Richmond Professor of Fine Art 4 items
    Nick Pearce will examine the particular example of a human skull to illustrate the way objects can change in both form and meaning. The treatment of human remains in the museum is particularly sensitive. Collecting, displaying and storing human remains have become increasingly contentious practices in the museum. You should look at some of the literature below which addresses these issues, in addition to the literature on object biographies from week 2.
    1. Required reading 4 items
      Please read some of the following before the session:
      1. Guidance for the care of human remains in museums - Great Britain. Department for Culture, Media and Sport 2005 (electronic resource)

        Document Essential

      2. Contesting human remains in museum collections: the crisis of cultural authority - Tiffany Jenkins, Ebooks Corporation Limited 2011 (electronic resource)

        Book Essential

  4. Week 4 Ethical Codes in Museums Frances Lennard 13 items
    This session looks at the codes of ethics adopted by museum and conservation organisations and considers their relationship with the way museum practice has developed in recent decades.
    1. Required reading 4 items
      1. Routledge companion to museum ethics: redefining ethics for the twenty-first century museum - Janet Marstine, Ebooks Corporation Limited 2011 (electronic resource)

        Book Essential See Chapter: Eastop, Dinah. “Conservation Practice as Enacted Ethics.”, pp. 426-444.

      2. Routledge companion to museum ethics: redefining ethics for the twenty-first century museum - Janet Marstine, Ebooks Corporation Limited 2011 (electronic resource)

        Book Essential See Chapter: Marstine, Janet. “The Contingent Nature of the New Museum Ethics.”, pp. 3-25.

    2. In preparation for the session, you should find and look at the codes of ethics of some of the professional organisations on the list below, or those in other countries. 2 items
    3. Further reading 2 items
      1. Conservation: principles, dilemmas and uncomfortable truths - Alison Richmond, Alison Lee Bracker, Victoria and Albert Museum, Dawson Books 2009 (electronic resource)

        Book Further See Chapter: Jokilehto, Jukka. “‘Conservation Principles in the International Context.", pp. 73-83.

    4. Week 5 St Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art Where Angels fear to tread? The challenges of exhibiting the sacred Harry Dunlop, Leaning and Access Curator, Glasgow Museums Resource Centre 5 items
      Objects used in religious practice are among the most significant of all. This session looks at the challenges of presenting and interpreting religious objects and uses the award-winning St Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art in Glasgow as a case study.
      1. Required reading 2 items
      2. Further reading 3 items
        1. Textiles and text: re-establishing the links between archival and object-based research : postprints - Maria Hayward, Elizabeth Kramer, AHRC Research Centre for Textile Conservation and Textile Studies. Conference 2007

          Book Further See Chapter: Morris, Bernice and Brooks Mary M. “Jewish ceremonial textiles and the Torah: exploring conservation practices in relation to ritual textiles associated with holy texts.”, pp. 244-248.

        2. Religious objects in museums: private lives and public duties - Crispin Paine 2013

          Book Further

  5. Week 6 Cultural Heritage and the Community Frances Lennard 17 items
    There is increasing interaction between museums and other cultural institutions and the communities they represent. Museums can be a source of public benefit - in recent years the UK government has seen museums as a way of tackling social problems such as social exclusion. Museum displays can help to provide a source of identity for groups within a society, such as immigrant communities, while working as a volunteer facilitates even greater involvement. There have been many recent initiatives to present conservation to the visiting public and they are often fascinated by this glimpse into a world behind the scenes. This can promote even greater engagement with sites and objects.
    1. Required reading 15 items
      Please read some of these before the session:
      1. Museums and their communities - Sheila Watson 2007

        Book Essential See Chapter: Davis, Peter. “Place Exploration: Museums, Identity and Community.", pp. 53-75.

      2. Frame, Kate. “Communicating Conservation at the Historic Royal Palaces.” In ICOM CC, 15th Triennial Conference, New Delhi, 22-26 September 2008, Preprints, edited by Janet Bridgland, 1147-1153. 2008

        Chapter Essential See Chapter: Frame, Kate. “Communicating Conservation at the Historic Royal Palaces.” pp. 1147-1153.

      3. It's a material world - Samuel Jones, John Holden, Demos (Organization : London, England) 2008

        Book Essential Also available online: https://www.demos.co.uk/files/Material%20World%20-%20web.pdf

      4. New museum theory and practice: an introduction - Janet Marstine, Ebooks Corporation Limited 2006 (electronic resource)

        Book Essential See Chapter: Lindauer, Margaret. “The Critical Museum Visitor.”, 203-255.

      5. New museum theory and practice: an introduction - Janet Marstine, Ebooks Corporation Limited 2006 (electronic resource)

        Book Essential See Chapter: Simpson, Moira G. “Revealing and Concealing: Museums, Objects, and the Transmission of Knowledge in Aboriginal Australia.”, pp. 152-177.

      6. Textile conservation: advances in practice - Ebooks Corporation Limited 2010

        Book Essential See Chapter: Rendell, Caroline, Norman Emery, Chris Scott, and Jim Devenport. “The Esh Winning Miners’ Banner Project – Conservation Involvement in a Community Initiative.”, pp. 123-130.

      7. Museums, prejudice and the reframing of difference - Richard Sandell, Dawson Books 2007 (electronic resource)

        Book Essential See Chapter 1: Sandell, Richard. “Museums and the Good Society.”, pp. 1-26.

      8. Decolonizing conservation: caring for Maori meeting houses outside New Zealand - Dean Sully, University College, London. Institute of Archaeology c2007

        Book Essential

      9. Collecting the Troubles at the Ulster Museum Saturday, 1 Dec 2018

        Audio-visual document Essential

      10. Narrating objects, collecting stories: essays in honour of Professor Susan M. Pearce - Sandra H. Dudley, Susan M. Pearce 2012

        Book Essential See: The Material Culture of Conflict: Artefacts in the Museum of Free Derry, Northern Ireland - Elizabeth Crooke, pp. 25-35.

    2. Websites 2 items
  6. Week 8 Cultural Heritage – Significance and Value Frances Lennard 12 items
    Attitudes to objects of cultural value have changed over the past twenty years, leading in many cases to the development of co-operative relationships between museum professionals and aboriginal communities, particularly in north America, Australia and New Zealand. Professional codes of ethics have been amended in response to these changes, as discussed in Week 4. At the same time, it is now recognised that not all objects can be considered to have equal value – in order to prioritise resources, museums and other bodies have to make decisions about which objects of cultural and historic significance they should preserve.
    1. Required reading 9 items
      1. Refashioning and redress: conserving and displaying dress - Getty Conservation Institute 2016

        Book Essential See Chapter: Atkinson, H., Vicki Couzens, Lee Darroch, Genevieve Grieves, Samantha Hamilton, Holly Jones-Amin, Mandy Nicholson and Amanda Reynolds. ““Wrapped in Country.”, pp. 49-64.

      2. Preserving what is valued: museums, conservation, and First Nations - Miriam Clavir, University of British Columbia. Museum of Anthropology c2002

        Book Essential See: Clavir, Miriam. “Introduction,”, pp. xvii-xxiv

      3. Preventive conservation practice, theory and research: preprints of the contributions to the Ottawa Congress, 12-16 September 1994 - Ashok Roy, Perry Smith, International Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works. Congress c1994

        Book Essential See Chapter: Dollery, Diane. “A Methodology of Preventive Conservation for Large, Expanding and Mixed Archaeological Collections.”, pp. 69-72.

      4. Textile conservation: advances in practice - Ebooks Corporation Limited 2010

        Book Essential See Chapter: Heald, Susan. “Partnership in the Preservation of Tangible and Intangible Cultural Heritage at the National Museum of the American Indian.”, pp. 108-115.

      5. The dress detective: a practical guide to object-based research in fashion - Ingrid Mida, Alexandra Kim, Ebooks Corporation Limited 2015

        Book Essential Read Chapter 1 and have a look at Chapters 2-5 and one of the case studies.

      6. Authenticity and replication: the "real thing" in art and conservation : proceedings of the International Conference held at the University of Glasgow, 6-7 December 2012 2014

        Book Essential See Chapter: Morena, Jill. “Definitions of Authenticity: a Study of the Relationship Between the Reproduction and Original Gone With The Wind costumes at the Harry Ransom Center.” , pp. 119-130.

    2. Website 1 item
    3. Further reading 2 items
      1. Exhibiting Māori: a history of colonial cultures of display - Conal McCarthy c2007

        Book Further

      2. Conservation: principles, dilemmas and uncomfortable truths - Alison Richmond, Alison Lee Bracker, Victoria and Albert Museum, Dawson Books 2009 (electronic resource)

        Book Further See Chapter: Smith, C. and Scott, M. “Ethics and Practice: Australian and New Zealand Conservation Contexts.”, pp. 184-196.

  7. Week 9 ‘Our Ancestors have come to visit’: The Blackfoot Shirts Project and the Revitalisation of Cultural Knowledge Alison Brown, Senior Lecturer in Social Anthropology, University of Aberdeen 4 items
    Alison will talk about a collaborative research project with the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford in which she participated. Five early 19th century Blackfoot hide and quillwork shirts were taken to southern Alberta, Canada, for exhibition and extended handling sessions with Blackfoot people; around 600 Blackfoot people were able to handle the shirts.
    1. Required reading 4 items
      1. Pitt Rivers Museum project website

        Website Essential Please look at some of the articles under the links from ‘About the Shirts’ on the Pitt Rivers Museum project website.

      2. Kaahsinnonniksi Ao'toksisawooyawa: Our Ancestors Have Come to Visit: Reconnections with Historic Blackfoot Shirts - Alison K. Brown, Laura Peers, Heather Richardson 2010

        Book Essential

      3. Museums and source communities: a Routledge reader - Laura L. Peers, Alison K. Brown 2003

        Book Essential

  8. Week 10 Archaeological assemblage work 3 items
    1. Archaeology and Assemblage - Yannis Hamilakis, Andrew Meirion Jones 02/2017

      Article  This is an introduction to a special section on assemblages in archaeology so do dip into the other papers in this volume to give you a flavour of theoretical concerns.

    2. Art and archaeology: collaborations, conversations, criticisms - SpringerLink (Online service) 2014

      Book  See: An archaeology of Francis Bacon's Studio, O'Connor, Blaze 2014 Dust and Debitage.

  9. Week 11 Artists’ Intent - Textile Art Frances Lennard 8 items
    Many museums now actively collect contemporary textile artworks; the Whitworth Art Gallery in Manchester has a good collection. This session considers the role of the artist as stakeholder in making decisions about objects in galleries and museums - how important is the artist’s intent for his or her work? The collection and maintenance of modern and contemporary works of art can be problematic – for many artists, the degradation of the piece is part of its message while others have differing attitudes to the longevity of the materials used, and to repairs and conservation. The legal restrictions on altering artworks may also affect the way such pieces are considered and treated.
    1. Required reading 5 items
      1. Modern art, new museums: contributions to the Bilbao Congress, 13-17 September 2004 - Ashok Roy, Perry Smith, International Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works. Congress 2004

        Book Essential See Chapter: French, Ann. “Textile or Art? The Conservation, Display and Storage of Modern Textile Art.”, pp. 34-38.

      2. Conservation: principles, dilemmas and uncomfortable truths - Alison Richmond, Alison Lee Bracker, Victoria and Albert Museum, Dawson Books 2009 (electronic resource)

        Book Essential See Chapter: Wharton, G. and Molotch, H. “The Challenge of Installation Art.”, pp. 210-222.

    2. Website 1 item
    3. Further reading 2 items
      1. New museum theory and practice: an introduction - Janet Marstine, Ebooks Corporation Limited 2006 (electronic resource)

        Book Further See Chapter: Barker, Rachel and Patricia Smithen. “New Art, New Challenges: The Changing Face of Conservation in the Twenty-first Century.”, pp. 85-105.